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nzprotests5 DECEMBER 2010: Members of the public who want to demonstrate their opposition to a NAFTA-style TPP and hear from alternative TPP experts and commentators this week in Auckland have three great opportunities to do so, with two public demonstrations on Monday and a public meeting on Tuesday 7 December.

Information is as follows:

Protests:  Monday 6th December: “No to the TPPA. Stop Gambling with Our Future
8.30am, SKYCITY Convention Centre, Federal Street, Auckland

5.30pm, Voyager Maritime Museum, Corner Quay and Hobson Streets, Auckland Viaduct Basin

Public meeting: Tuesday 7th December


6-8 pm           St-Matthew-in-the-City, cnr Hobson & Wellesley Sts, Auckland


Main speaker: Prof Jane Kelsey. Commentators Mike Smith, Sanya Read Smith (Third World Network), Andrew Campbell (FinSec) and other international guests(
The views expressed during this event are not necessarily those of St Matthew-in-the-City)

The Tuesday event is free. All members of the public are completely welcome to all events, whether they consider themselves well-familiarised with free trade agreements or whether they are anxious to learn more about what they may contain and NZ’s role within them.

Also note that Jane Kelsey and Third World Network's Sanya Read Smith, who will be present in Auckland for the talks, will each be speaking about the leak and other TPP issues at a media briefing at the Welcome Room, Sky City Hotel, at 3pm on Monday 6 December. All media are welcome for this event.

While a number of key activities and discussions will be private and not open to the media, those not attending the talks but following them locally during the week may be interested in this programme of stakeholders' events. It includes presentations by both business and civil society groups, including Council of Trade Unions chief economist Bill Rosenberg and Agcarm Chief Executive Graeme Peters. Thursday and Friday's seminars are devoted to environmental issues and the question of how the TPP will deal with these.

 

ustr572 SEPTEMBER 2010: Inside US Trade reports the the Office of the US Trade Representative is currently pursuing multiple approaches to achieve 'regulatory coherence' among TPP parties. This is being done to relieve barriers to exports. USTR is currently asking private-sector stakeholders to identify priority areas where regulatory barriers need to be examined and potentially removed.

Assistant US Trade Representative has also indicated that the US is keen to look at establishing new TPP-wide regulatory systems for emerging industries, as well as increasing transparency in current regulatory requirements among TPP countries - this may be done through the construction of a database that provides all information on these requirements in one place for those who may want to trade within the TPP.

It is reported that other USTR officials suggested that the Obama administration is looking to expand the provisions on labour and environmental protections before what was inclued in past US agreements. This may include cooperative efforts on job creation and skills enhancement, and the promotion and regulatory reform of 'green' technology. Particular areas of interest cited by US Trade Reps have reportedly been illegal logging, wildlife trafficking, and marine conservation.

 

pen24 JULY 2010: The Wall Street Journal reports a US trade official as saying that enough may have been done in the TPP talks last week for parties to start drafting a core text for the pact by October, at the third round of negotiations in Brunei. However, the official also reported that the task of structuring market-opening timelines for manufactured goods and agriculture will still require further discussions. It is understood that the US is keen to preserve existing market access plans in its existing trade deals with Australia, Chile, and Singapore, rather than developing a complicated new schedule.

The official also said that the pace of talks would mean that partners interested in becoming part of the initial bloc, such as Canada and Malaysia, would have to come to the table by early next year. As was suggested during the talks, this also presumably means that those new countries would need to agree to what was already in place amongst the original eight member states.

The WSJ also relayed that there was 'consensus' about additional measures to spur job creation and preserve the environment in the eventual agreement, although more substantive details were not offered.

 

factory-workers22 JUNE 2010: US Representatives Linda Sanchez (California-D) and George Miller (California-D) have written an op-ed in the Huffington Post, framing the TPP talks as an 'excellent opportunity' for Barack Obama to deliver on his trade campaign committments and break away from the NAFTA models of the 1990s onwards. They call for the TPP to build on the initial improvements to the Peru Free Trade Agreement (negotiated for by House Democrats in 2007) by redressing currently 'excessive' foreign investor privileges, more stringent safety and inspection standards for food and manufactured goods, and promote US-based green manufacturing.

It also examines the records of Brunei and Vietnam and calls for the final text to include a democracy clause of some sort, cautioning that their inclusion may otherwise promote sweatshop labour in Asia while damaging industry in the US.

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North.island.arp.300pix17 JUNE 2010 - The Christchurch Press in New Zealand has run an op-ed by Council of Trade Unions policy director Bill Rosenberg, which highlights what he sees as the potentially risky areas of the TPP negotiations. He argues that for any final negotiated agreement to be truly '21st century', it must tightly regulate financial services and control the international flow of currency, especially subsequent to the credit crunch. Additionally, he argues that negotiations need to respect the independence of NZ's Pharmac agency as well as its current overseas investment rules. The full article follows below the break.

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15 JUNE 2010: The Washington, DC-based Citizens' Trade Campaign has issued a press release on behalf of its 18 national organisations, calling for TPP negotiating parties to embark on their second round of talks with the reform commitments in international trade Barack Obama made on his 2008 campaign trail.Once again, they are asking that USTR negotiators look to the Trade, Reform, Accountability, Development and Employment (TRADE) Act as a map for further negotiation. The full press release follows below.

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san-francisco15 JUNE 2010: San Francisco community newspaper the San Francisco Appeal reports that representatives of labour, environmental, andl civil society groups will demonstrate alongside a mix of other activists outside the second round of TPP negotiations, which began on Monday at the South of Market area of San Francisco's CBD. Local area politicians will appear alongside the California Fair Trade Coalition and the San Francisco Labor Council at the rally. The demonstration has been described as an attempt to channel the talks toward job retention, environmental protection, and human rights.

A noon concert by The Pretenders' Chrissie Hynde, in association with PETA, aimed to highlight the Australian wool industry's failure to stop mulesing of lambs, while a number of public health groups have also been campaigning ahead of this week's meeting to retain US controls on tobacco in any negotiation.

 

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congress7 JUNE 2010 - The Wall Street Journal has written on the 'relatively modest regional deal' (in their words) that is the TPP. The pieces focuses on the gaps between the Obama administration, civil society groups, and business interests around the agreement, and quotes the National Association of Manufacturers' fears that inclusion of '21st century' labour and environmental standards could end up being too tough.

The article also quotes the sponsor of the TRADE Act bill, Michael Michaud, as reporting that House supporters of the Act's aims have met with the USTR and are working towards a 'positive trade agenda'.

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scenic_lake24 JUNE 2010: Following a call by the USTR for submissions for a proposed TPP environmental review, Defenders of Wildlife, Earthjustice, the Environmental Investigation Agency, Friends Of The Earth US, and The Sierra Club have written a nine-page submission urging for negotiators to ensure that all imports of wood, wildlife or products thereof meet the standards and laws of their country of origin. The groups have argued that a strongly-worded agreement could curb illegal regional trade in these products. In doing so, they hope that the TPP will take its cues from the 2008 US Lacey Act, which currently governs US prohibitions on illegally sourced fish, wildlife, and plant products.

The submitting groups are particularly worried about observing member Vietnam and prospective member Malaysia's reputations for illegal logging, as well as Chile and Peru's issues with illegal trade in fish. Inside US Trade reports that the environmental review will continue throughout negotiations, with a final report to be produced at their conclusion.

The groups additionally seek a scale-back of the ability for private entities to challenge government decisions in investor-state disputes, saying that these run against the ability of governments to regulate in the public interest. Their full letter can be read here.

 

peru_flag26 MARCH 2010 - La Republica and IPS report that a former Peruvian Deputy Minister of Labour, Julio Gamero, has warned that the large number of trade agreeements Peru has signed in the past year, as well as the impending negotiations in the TPP, may be having a negative impact on labour rights.

Gamero warned IPS that over the past three years, the number of collective bargaining agreements, health and safety inspections, and unionised members of the workforce has fallen dramatically. He is critical of the government's response, saying that it was not until a US delegation on labour issues visited Lima that a liaison office between government and unions was created. Coordinator for the Peruvian Network for Globalisation with Equity (RedGE), Alejandra Alayza, says it is essential to guarantee labour rights in any further agreements so that workers may share in the benefits.

The IPS article, which follows below, also looks at the effect of tariff-lowering on peasant farmers, as well as the TPA with the United States's impact on indigenous forestry rights and intellectual property.

 

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ustr5721 MAY 2010 - Last week was deemed 'World Trade Week' in the United States by the Obama Administration, and saw US Trade Representative Ron Kirk has been work to encourage buy-in for support of the TPP from both the US Chamber of Commerce and members of the public.

On 18 May, Kirk spoke to the US Chamber of Commerce's 'Next Steps on World Trade' conference
, with a focus on his administration's 'high-standard, 21st century, Asia-Pacfic regional trade agreement'. He again confirmed that San Francisco would be the site of negotiations on the week of June 14. With regards to market access arrangements, he said that any agreement would need to be 'forward looking' while also possessing 'enough flexibility to accomodate sensitivities'.

Kirk also indicated that the second round of negotiations would focus on 'value-added' benefits of a regional agreement, such as greater regulatory cooperation on issues such as food safety.


On 21 May, the USTR held an "online chat" session in which it answered submitted questions about various aspects of the TPP. The chat indicated that the USTR is focused on obtaining an investor-state dispute mechanism for the TPP, that it intends to 'consult closely with stakeholders' over the possible changes to rules of origin in the US textile industry that the TPP would require, and that the US will seek 'high-standard' IP enforcement rights. A transcript of the chat follows below.

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scenic_lake28 MAY 2010 - The US Trade Representative has called for written comments from the public ahead of an environmental review of the proposed TPP legislation, initiated through the Trade Policy Staff Committee (TPSC). The TPSC is requesting the written comments from the public in order to establish the scope of the environmental review, including potential environmental effects that may flow from the trade agreement and its possible effect on domestic US environmental laws and regulations. The focus of the review is on the US, but global and trans-boundary impacts may be considered where appropriate and prudent.

The closing date for public comment is June 1 2010. Comments are to be submitted online at http://www.regulations.gov. For
alternatives to on-line submissions, please contact Gloria Blue, Executive Secretary, Trade Policy Staff Committee (TPSC), at (202) 395-3475.

The TPSC says that public comments regarding environmental matters that were submitted for the first round of public submissions on the TPP will be taken into account in this review, and do not need to be re-submitted.

 

australasia_1APRIL 2 2010: The possibility of a broad regional trade agreement in the Pacific is reportedly leading Australia, New Zealand and Singapore to consider reopening the market access arrangements in their own existing bilateral trade agreements. While sources are suggesting this is being done with an intention of creating a single, unified market access schedule to eliminate a 'spaghetti bowl' effect ahead of a TPP Agreement, a USTR official has already expressed doubts about reopening these agreements at a sensitive time. An Inside US Trade story follows below the break...

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MARCH 15, 2010: highway20workersTrade unions from across the Pacfic have called for a fairer trade agreement network today, fearing the possible outcomes of an 'everything on the table' agreement. New Zealand's Council of Trade Unions has been keeping counsel with its counterparts in the US and Australia. The joint declaration of the combined TPP unions (Australia, NZ, Singapore, USA) can be read here. The individual unions, including CTU have issued their own statements.

 

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australian flagMARCH 15, 2010: Barack Obama is due to meet with his Australian counterpart, Kevin Rudd, on March 26. The whirlwind stop in Canberra is likely to cover the by-then complete negotiation rounds in Melbourne for the TPP agreement. While Obama is quick to hail the 'model alliance' between the US and Australia, serious doubts are rising in Rudd's capital about the lack of consultation and analysis going ahead into the negotiations, as an excellently-argued  Canberra Times op-ed by Professor Thomas Faunce expresses today...

 

 

 

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